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Meet Zara a 3 1/2 year old English Staffy.

Zara has been coming to Tallebudgera Veterinary Clinic since her puppy vaccines for all of her health needs.

A couple of weeks ago Zara presented to Tallebudgera Veterinary Clinic with a bit of a spot..

WHAT IS THE SPOT????

Dr Caroline took a sample of the spot and cultured it in house with a Fungassay Test.

7 days later 

What was the result???

Zara tested POSITIVE to ringworm…..

(image below shows a negative ringworm culture beside Zara’s positive for comparison)

This leaves us with the question..

WHAT IS RINGWORM?
With so many parasites out there, it is tempting to think that ringworm is in the same family as hookworm, whipworm, roundworm and tapeworm.
Despite the name ringworm, Ringworm is in fact NOT actually a worm but a FUNGUS!!

Ringworm fungus is common all over the world and infects all species of domestic animals INCLUDING HUMANS! This is why it is so important for us as pet owners to know the symptoms, causes and treatment options for ringworm.

Ringworm, as the fungus is most commonly called is known for its round raised red ring type appearance.

HOW IS RINGWORM SPREAD?
Ringworm is spread through direct contact with the fungus. For example, touching the wound, contaminated combs, food bowls, carpet, bedding.
The spores are actually viable for up to 18 months living in the environment.

WHAT DO I LOOK FOR?
I think my dog might have ringworm….
Ringworm usually presents as a small circular area of hair loss on the animal. They may appear to be healing in the center whilst enlarging at the same time and this creates a patchy appearance which may be inflamed or scabby.   Ringworm is not commonly itchy, the hair follicles become dry and brittle causing the hair to break off and spread the disease throughout your home.

CONTACT YOUR VET IF YOUR DOG IS EXPERIENCING ANY OR ALL OF THESE SYMPTOMS:

  • Circular patches of hair loss.
  • Dry, brittle, flaky coat.
  • Patchy, scabby or inflamed skin.
  • Rough, dry or brittle claws.

WHAT WILL MY VET DO?
When you present to your vet with suspected ringworm, your pet will receive a thorough examination, usually a skin scraping to rule out any other conditions. If all other conditions are ruled out a sample will then be taken to perform an in house culture called a Fungassay (as seen in the pictures above) . This culture can take up to 14 days to confirm either a positive or negative result for ringworm.

POSITIVE RESULT?
If like Zara your dog has a positive ringworm result treatment with your vet will commence. This can vary from topical medications to oral medications depending on the vet’s decisions. It is also very important to treat the environment in which your pet lives to prevent any further flare ups or passing it onto any other family members including us humans.

NEGATIVE RESULT?
Further investigations will be commenced to get to the bottom of your pets condition.

ZARA HAS COMMENCED HER RINGWORM TREATMENT AND WE WILL UPDATE YOU WITH THE RESULTS WHEN SHE IS ALL RECOVERED