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Yesterday Poppy, a 1 year old Pugalier, came into Tallebudgera Veterinary Clinic for her desexing.
It was a very stressful morning for her mummy who was not quite sure what was going to unfold on the day of surgery.

Poppy was admitted by a nurse at 8am fasted from the night before. Once she had received a thorough health examination by one of our veterinarians she was given a pre-med injection.

 

But what was this pre-med?
SEDATION. Now this put her mum’s heart at ease to know that her baby would be relaxed and sleepy.
She was then placed into a cosy bed to prepare for the day ahead.

Once she was nice and relaxed her intravenous catheter was placed, and some bloods were taken.

 

Question: She is so young? Why bloods?
Answer: At Tallebudgera Veterinary Clinic we want to take all steps to make sure that your pet’s anaesthetic runs as smoothly as possible. Running a pre anaesthetic blood profile helps the vets to assess the liver, kidney and blood functions. This tells us if your pet is going to tolerate the anaesthetic and if there are any discrepancies in the blood work. The vets can then tailor the anaesthetic to suit the patient’s needs or possibly reschedule the procedure. Running a blood panel at a young age is also a fantastic way to give us a base line of your pets blood work, that way if they are ever unwell we can compare results.

When Poppy was finally ready for theatre after receiving the all clear from her blood work she was given  a general anaesthetic and taken into theatre.
Once in theatre she was placed on a heated bed and hooked up to a Surgivet Monitor. This machine monitors her vitals alongside her own personal surgery nurse. She was also hydrated via intravenous fluids throughout the entire procedure. Under legal requirements all animals desexed also receive a small tattoo in their left ear.

Poppy was also treated to a complementary nail clip and ear clean.
Once surgery was finished she was given two pain injections to keep her as pain free as possible and a small dressing was placed over her surgery site. She was then placed back into her cosy bed with warm blankets alongside a nice hot water bottle, whilst the nurse watched her wake up from anaesthetic.

Poppy went home that evening with a Buster collar to prevent her from getting at her sutures, 4 days of pain medications and we will be seeing her in 3 days for a complimentary post-operative check-up and then again at 10 days to remove her sutures.
It was an absolute pleasure to have such a sweetheart in the clinic and we look forward to seeing her again soon.